Category: Administration (page 1 of 3)

One Working Capital Management Strategic Tool: Interfund Transfers

By Michelle Lofton and Mikhail Ivonchyk

Working capital management is a managerial strategy that monitors and uses current assets (e.g., cash, accounts receivable, and inventory) and current liabilities (e.g., accounts payable and notes payable) to ensure smooth operations. The purpose is to maintain cash flows for liquidity to meet short-term operating expenses and obligations. This integral part of sound financial management uses a variety of strategic tools to manage cash flows. These can include the use of unrestricted cash, savings, interfund borrowing, interfund transfers, delaying payments, receivables, a line of credit, direct lending arraignments, and short-term debt. Yet, little academic research on governments has evaluated the process for selecting different tools, the policies governments have in place to implement them, and the consequences of using one tool over another.

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So, Your Jurisdiction is Thinking of Starting a Revenue Manual…

Consulting and updating your revenue manual is the first step of the administrative process for revenue forecasting.  At least, that is what I say when I teach revenue forecasting.  Of course, when I then turn to the course participants and ask how many of them have revenue manuals in their jurisdiction only one or two raise their hands.  In fact, there are some years when no one raises their hand.

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Who Says You are an Appraiser? Appraisal and other Property Tax Certifications, Credit Hours, and Designations

There are many certification programs involved with property tax.  I suggest that every NC property tax student be familiar with which organizations provide certifications, credit hours, and the requirements of those organizations. A certification or designation is required by law for some positions. Two are required in the assessor’s office. If you are one of the 100 appointed county assessors in North Carolina or a county appraiser, you must be certified by the NC Department of Revenue. Becoming and being a certified assessor or appraiser includes requirements for initial certification (certifying education) and also follow-up requirements for continuing education. If you represent yourself as a real estate appraiser but do not fill one of the two positions above, NC law requires your certification to be through the NC Appraisal Board. All other certification programs for property tax are not legally required in NC law but may be required by your employer or by your association. Perhaps you’re not currently in a position that is required to be certified but your future could lead you in that direction. Regardless, I think you should maintain your course records for attendance and successful completion of property tax courses. I have recognized uncertainty in this area over the years and it seems to be more so in recent times. I hope this post is a way to help bring us back to certainty. Continue reading

Sales Tax Considerations During the Pandemic

I have been having a great deal of conversations with folks across the state about what is going on with their sales taxes (and occupancy and food and beverage taxes).  What has happened versus what was expected for FY21 and what they are thinking about for FY22 now that local governments are starting to begin their budget processes.  I thought it might be useful to share some of the questions I have been getting and my answers to them and some of my broader thoughts about sales taxes and the pandemic, though it is no crystal ball.  I am going to structure it like a q&a.  I am not covering everything here and please reach out if there is more than I can help with.

 

  • Q: Our sales taxes are recovering quickly, what are you seeing other places in the state?
  • A: We are seeing that sales taxes have recovered more quickly than most people anticipated. That is great news, but I think a dose of caution should accompany it.  First, we see a bump starting in in the June collections (so sales for the month of May) where it went from down 13.3% year-over-year to down 4% year-over-year and then by July (so June sales) it was up year-over-year by 10.75%.  So that is all really promising, but we have to keep a few things in mind.  1) That is right when the state moved into Phase 2 and there may have been pent up demand. 2) That is when we have more generous unemployment benefits and federal stimulus, so people had more disposable income than they might otherwise have had.  3) Some people were deferring payments on rent and/or utilities, so they had less income than it looked like from their spending in that period.  Also, that trend is not universal.  Some areas are doing much better and others are having a slower recovery.

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Webinar: Budgeting in the Pandemic

As governments are nearing the end of budget season in these uncertain times we want to make sure you all are aware of some of the resources available from the School of Government and our partners.  There are many COVID-19 resources at the UNC SOG dedicated Microsite.

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The COVID-19 Crisis and How North Carolina Local Governments are Budgeting for It

Recently the North Carolina League of Municipalities (NCLM) and the North Carolina Local Government Budget Association (NCLGBA) partnered on a survey of county and municipal governments across the state to better understand how local governments are budgeting for FY21.  There are 142  responses.  29 are from counties and 113 are from municipalities.  See the map below to see the number of jurisdictions from each county area (total of the county and municipal responses).


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2021 Virginia Cup Effort

“I can’t think of anything that shows you are more committed to your work and your profession than a professional designation. A job applicant who has a professional designation earns an automatic interview from me.”
Marcus Kinrade, AAS, RES
Wake County Tax Administrator

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Social Impact Bonds: A Magic Tool for Financing Innovation?

Have you heard about social impact bonds (SIBs) yet?  If not there are a lot of resources and discussion out there regarding this magical fix of financial woes of government.  While many have viewed these as too good of an opportunity to pass up (for example, see here and here), others have been slightly more skeptical.

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A New Collection Available from an Old Resource

In this post, I wanted to share that the School of Government’s Knapp Library has a new collection for North Carolina’s assessment community. This is a short post because I anticipate most of the reading will occur as you explore the links in this post. In January, IAAO announced the availability of their new collection of informational books on assessment, Apendium.

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Budgeting in Local Government course: Registration now open

Budgeting in Local Government
November 6-9, 2018, School of Government

This four-day course covers the legal and management framework of budget preparation and enactment in North Carolina local government.  Participants will discuss the numerous processes and techniques used to produce an annual operating budget and capital budget.

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