Category: Tax Policy (page 1 of 4)

The NC Candidates’ Club Challenge

It wasn’t always called the NC Candidates’ Club. There was no need to designate it as the “NC” club because we were the only such club in the nation. The club started in 1984 at what was then called the “Institute of Government”, so it was first named the Institute of Government’s Candidates’ Club. Just one year earlier, a young appraiser who started his career in Tennessee began lecturing at UNC’s Institute of Government. His name was Joe Hunt and is now known by many as one who advanced the science and art of property tax assessment in North Carolina.

Joe Hunt, CAE

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A Reappraisal Citizen Advisory Committee, would it work?

How might a citizen advisory committee aid in the reappraisal process? In the SOG publication, “Creating and Maintaining Effective Local Government Citizen Advisory Committees, Upshaw, 2010″, here is the introductory reason to have CACs:

When communities face complex issues affecting large, diverse groups, citizen engagement leads to people being better informed, better able to collaborate with others, and more active in addressing issues that affect them. By sharing responsibility, local officials increase opportunities for citizens to contribute to the common good.

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Assess what Exists, and Ghost Assets do not

A question was asked earlier this week about a company’s records that do not agree with previous listings. I think an important question to ask in these situations is whether either resource (the records or the listing) match what really exists. This brings up a few good business personal property topics to review. Do you believe in Ghosts? Don’t be scared. Continue reading

Are You Calculated or Deeded?

…on a south branch of White Oak on the south south side as follows. Beginning at a pine thence So67W 140 poles to a branch to three pines thence So7Et 120 poles to a post…to the beginning Containing 100 acres more or less.

A county mapper recently contacted me with a question and not surprisingly I had to learn the answer myself to provide an answer. I am not a mapper nor have I had the opportunity to work closely with mappers, so if you can add to this discussion, please do so below through “Leave a Reply”. While searching for the answer, some documents were revealed that I think will be helpful to others.

The issue involved a county that assesses land based on deeded acres, which may include road right of way. The question was whether there is guidance to help establish a county policy identifying assessment best practice regarding situations where deeded acreage may include road right of way or when deeded acreage varies from calculated acreage.  The answer is, yes.

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Acronyms Online, USPAP, PTAX, and PTEP

This post shares some information coming from the recent announcement of USPAP availability online. It’s also a reminder of how to join PTAX, and where to find the latest PTEP calendar.  If you have questions or comments about any of these, please click “Leave a Reply” at the bottom of this post.

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Of Interest to You

In November 2017, the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) issued an Exposure Draft entitled Accounting for Interest Cost during the Period of Construction.  The GASB is proposing a standard that would significantly change the way certain interest costs are accounted for during the period of construction of capital assets.  And (for once) for the better!  If approved in its current form (and I do not anticipate any real challenges to this proposal), governmental entities would simply recognize interest as an expense or an expenditure in the period it’s incurred, whether or not it is during the construction period.  As such, there would be no further interest capitalization to calculate and report.

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Maybe We Should KISS and Make Up

KISS is only one acronym or abbreviation for the minimalist approach I’m referring to in this post. Another popular way to put it is “less is more”. Maybe my favorite is “simplicity is the ultimate sophistication”.

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Upcoming Workshop: Implementing Field Experiments for Innovation and Success

Good morning!  I wanted to make people aware that there will be a free workshop on 12/13 from 11-12 as a pre-conference event for the North Carolina Local Government Budget Association’s Winter Conference (NCLGBA).  This year’s NCLGBA conference is in Durham at the Washington Duke Inn.

Implementing Field Experiments for Innovation and Success

Is your service delivery not as effective as it should be? Could your department streamline current processes?   Do you see problems in your organization but lack ideas on how to address it?  If so, this is the pre-conference workshop for you.

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Municipalities and the Great Recession

Much has been written about the impact of the Great Recession on state governments and larger cities, but we have yet to see deep analysis on how smaller municipalities weathered the recession. To get the ball rolling my students and I have analyzed the impact of the recession on smaller cities in Georgia and Florida and are currently adding an additional eleven states to the analysis. To begin we selected two states that have somewhat different revenue structures:

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State Collection of County Financial Data Sources

By Zach Mohr and Madison Esterle

One of the fundamental problems for local government public budget and finance research in the United States is the availability of audited financial data in a format that is easy to collect and analyze. This is a problem for both researchers that are trying to assemble large data sets and for practitioners that live in states that do not have centralized collection of this data. It is also a problem for cross state data collection, which is quite common for local jurisdictions that live on the borders of states. Undoubtedly, there is much duplication of effort and a great need for local government financial information that is comparable for research and practice.

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